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Love Your Pet Day – February 20

On February 20th, pet lovers everywhere observe National Love Your Pet Day.  This holiday is a day set aside to give extra attention to and pamper your pets.  This is a good day to focus on the special relationship that you have with your pets.

Did you know that most households in the United States have at least one pet?  In the United States, dogs are slightly more popular than cats, but not by much.  Pets are not limited to the canine and feline categories.  There are quite a few who prefer the companionship of birds, reptiles, fish or rats.  Whoever your pet companion is, we are sure you will enjoy spending a little extra time with them on National Love Your Pet Day and reap the benefits, as well such as stress relief and lower blood pressure.  So on February 20 (and every day) show your appreciation to your pets!

HOW TO OBSERVE
Bring your pet a special treat, take an extra long walk or give them more attention on National Love Your Pet Day.  Whatever you decide to do, spoil and appreciate your pets!  Use #NationalLoveYourPetDay to post on social media. To commemorate the day, I’m sharing two pages of the 2017 title: Doodles Canine Coloring Fun (available 8/1/2017). Download and share with friends.

HISTORY
Within our research, we were unable to identify the creator of National Love Your Pet Day.

There are over 1,200 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day with National Day Calendar!*

DOWNLOAD
Basset Hound coloring sheet
Dachshund coloring sheet

 

* http://www.nationaldaycalendar.com/national-love-your-pet-day-february-20/
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Labor Day Coloring Fun

doodles-ave-snoopy-labor-dayLabor Day: What it Means

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Labor Day Legislation

Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories*.

Founder of Labor Day

More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers*.

Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold*.”

But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic*.

After your exciting outdoor activities or you finish resting from your labor, top off the holiday with some coloring fun! 

Click the image to download.

Enjoy!

 

*https://www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history


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Canada Day

doodles-ave-canada-squirrelHappy Canada Day! On July 1, 1867, the nation was officially born when the Constitution Act joined three provinces into one country: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Canada province, which then split into Ontario and Quebec. However, Canada was not completely independent of England until 1982. The holiday called Dominion Day was officially established in 1879, but it wasn’t observed by many Canadians, who considered themselves to be British citizens. Dominion Day started to catch on when the 50th anniversary of the confederation rolled around in 1917. In 1946, a bill was put forth to rename Dominion Day, but arguments in the House of Commons over what to call the holiday stalled the bill.

The 100th anniversary in 1967 saw the growth of the spirit of Canadian patriotism and Dominion Day celebrations really began to take off. Although quite a few Canadians already called the holiday Canada Day (Fête du Canada), the new name wasn’t formally adopted until October of 1982.

Click the above image to download the coloring sheet. Enjoy!


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Father’s Day

Let’s celebrate the men in our lives who dare us to dream! Click the links below to download the coloring sheets and templates.

Certificate
Greeting Card
Coloring Sheet

Enjoy!


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Mothers Day Coloring Fun

Get your kids in on the hand made Mother’s Day card action!
Click the below links to download the coloring activities.

Mother’s Day Certificate Template
Mother’s Day Card Template
Giraffe Mom Best Mom Ever Trophy
Mother Giraffe

Enjoy and Happy Mother’s Day!


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Happy Earth Day

Earthday-2013Let’s paint the town green.

Going green is easier than you think. There are little things you can do every day to help reduce greenhouse gases and make a less harmful impact on the environment. Taking care of the Earth is not just a responsibility — it’s a privilege. ­In that spirit, HowStuffWorks came up with the top 5 things you can do to help save the Earth.

1.­ Pay attention to how you use water. The little things can make a big difference. Every time you turn off the water while you’re brushing your teeth, you’re doing something good. Got a leaky toilet? You might be wasting 200 gallons of water a day [source: EPA]. Try drinking tap water instead of bottled water, so you aren’t wasting all that packaging as well. Wash your clothes in cold water

2. Leave your car at home. If you can stay off the road just two days a week, you’ll reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an average of 1,590 pounds per year [source: EPA]. Combine your errands — hit the post office, grocery store and shoe repair place in one trip. It will save you gas and time.

3. Walk or ride your bike to work, school and anywhere you can. You can reduce greenhouse gases while burning some calories and improving your health. If you can’t walk or bike, use mass transit or carpool. Every car not on the road makes a difference.

4. Recycle.You can help reduce pollution just by putting that soda can in a different bin. If you’re trying to choose between two products, pick the one with the least packaging. If an office building of 7,000 workers recycled all of its office paper waste for a year, it would be the equivalent of taking almost 400 cars off the road [source: EPA].

5. Compost. Think about how much trash you make in a year. Reducing the amount of solid waste you produce in a year means taking up less space in landfills, so your tax dollars can work somewhere else. Plus, compost makes a great natural fertilizer. Composting is easier than you think.

http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/green-science/save-earth-top-ten.htm


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Groundhog Day

doodles-ave-groundhog-day

Happy Groundhog Day!!!

February 2, on which according to popular legend the groundhog emerges from its burrow, prompting the prediction of an early spring if it does not see its shadow or six more weeks of winter if it does.
Click the above image to download the coloring sheet.
Enjoy!


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12 Days of Christmas Coloring Fun-Day 3

doodles-ave-reindeer-paper-sack-craftdoodles-ave-santa-paper-sack-craftdoodles-ave-snowman-paper-sack-craft

On the third day: three paper sack craft templates

Click the images to download the templates.

What you’ll need:
1. Glue
2. Scissors
3. Colors and/or markers
4. Paper sack (brown or white)
5. Brads (optional for snowman’s arm movement)
6. Hole punch (optional for snowman’s arm movement)

How to make these:
1. Color the elements.
2. Cut the elements out.
3. Glue them to the sack.
4. Now you’re done!

Stay tuned for day four. 
Enjoy!


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Corn on the Cob Day

Corn-on-the-cob

June 11th is Corn on the Cob Day. Here are
some interesting Corn on the Cob Facts*: 
There are 155 calories in a cob of corn.

  • The USA produces 40% of the world’s corn – which is the most of any country.
  • The name maize comes from the Native American name for corn – mahiz.
  • 50% of the corn grown in the US is grown in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota and Nebraska.
  • To get the sweetest corn taste possible, eat it the same day it is picked!
  • An ear of corn has 18 rows and approximately 800 kernels.

Click the above image to download the coloring sheet. Enjoy!
* http://www.squidoo.com/corn-on-the-cob-day


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Mardi Gras

mardi-gras-mask

What is Mardi Gras* ?
Mardi Gras is French for “Fat Tuesday”.  The name comes from the ancient custom of parading a fat ox through Paris on this day.  The ox was to remind the people that they were not allowed to eat meat during Lent.  Lent runs from Ash Wednesday thru Easter Sunday.

Mardi Gras moves.  It can be anywhere between February 3rd and March 9th.  The date depends on when Easter falls.

French people who came to the United States brought the custom of Mardi Gras with them.  The most famous festival in the US (and perhaps the world) is at New Orleans in Louisiana *wistful sigh*– I’ve always wanted to go, not necessarily for Mardi Gras, but just to see it.

But Mardi Gras parades happen throughout the world.  Biloxi in Mississipi, Rio de Janeiro in Brazil, Nice in France, Binche in Belgiun and Viareggio in Italy are just a few examples.

The Tuesday that Mardi Gras falls on is also known as Shrove Tuesday.  The name comes from the custom of confessing on the day before lent.  Shrove means “to be forgiven one’s sins.”

* http://www.dltk-kids.com/crafts/mardigras/history.htm